Creating Art That Is Spot On!

My class of older students has spent a couple of weeks creating functional art works that are decorated entirely in spots. We looked at Australian Aboriginal artwork as well as the art of Leah Dorian as inspiration. All of these artists use dots to create complex images. Using these ideas as springboards, we moved into creating our own artworks.

Our supplies were fairly simple to get together. I was on one of my frequent visits to the Salvation Army, and I picked up a wooden salad bowl set for $4.00. The wood was nice and dark and the bowls were in really great condition. I then purchased a box of cotton swabs and brought in the usual array of acrylics, paper plates (as palettes) and water jugs.

The students were asked to create functional art pieces out of the re-purposed bowls and this was all the instruction they seemed to need. I didn’t tell them to paint an undercoat on the bowls but a few of them decided to do this on their own. Others just left the wood as-is and started painting dots immediately. Many started with simple patterns on their first bowls and then, on their second, moved in different directions. Sometimes, the materials are the catalyst for creativity, and this seemed to be the case.

Here are some of their works, completed, or in progress:

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Creative Chaos

Wow, last night’s art class ensured I fell asleep before both my own children after we got home! It was a whirlwind of excitement and busy-ness, where everyone was exploring for the entire time, so I count that as success. However, I am finding the class make-up this time around requires a little more energy than past years. I have six students who are 4-7 years old and four who are 9-15. I have divided the class into these same groups for the next few weeks and I think that division was wise.

With the younger group, we embarked on an “experiment with colours.” We started with baking soda, vinegar, food colouring, eye droppers, trays and cups of water. We tried various proportions and combinations of the ingredients until we got interesting new colours with proper fizzes and pops of liquid floating in our trays. We then practiced cleaning up all on our own, which was an experiment in-and-of-itself. Nevertheless, we got there and we were ready to set out on our second adventure: Contemporary circles and colours! We used paper cups and acrylic paint to make circles in colours of their choosing (we spend a lot of time practicing sharing, compromise, turn-taking). We then used brushes to fill in details. We ended by making “Respect Monsters,” which was a project one of the students really wanted to do (they have been learning about respect at school and he wanted a monster for his desk. The others felt it was a great idea.) The students responded especially well to the idea of experimentation. We asked questions along the way and I prompted with, “I wonder..” statements to generate discussing and prediction-making.

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Explosions

The older crew set out on an entirely different adventure: Fashion design. This past summer, while in Northern England, we came across an art show by students which focused on fashion. I was enchanted with the creativity of their arts expressions and I knew I wanted to try this with my own students.

I started by visiting the local thrift store, purchasing a number of interesting clothing items. I then added needles, thread, embroidery thread, beads, ribbon and cloth swatches to the mix. While I got the younger group set up, the older group chose their clothing items and began to plan. They needed very little guidance. The class rolled out as an inquiry, with the students making choices about how to attach things, and doing some preliminary design drawings. Their only snag was learning that they needed to be taught how to finish a stitch. I gave them a mini-lesson and then they were on their way again. I am incredibly excited to see the final products.

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The art that lives inside us!

Today, we all dove into our ongoing art works as soon as we arrived. Everyone was in a different place. Most people were working on their portraits, or their Picasso studies. Everyone embraced colour. I am finding that facilitating is so much better when everyone works at their own pace. Some students want to learn how to mix colours because their just-right colour isn’t in my selection. Some want to learn how to balance their works. Some teach each other how to blend oil pastels. Others go in a totally unplanned direction and make creatures, working in pairs and laughing at their combinations. Regardless of where they all are, they ask to explore something as it relates to the image they are striving to create. This is when learning is magical – the sweet spot. They learn because they want to learn and not because I think they should learn.

Here are some of their results:

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She spent a great deal of time trying to master blending with oil pastels and the results were powerful. She taught the others what she had learned.

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She mixed every colour on her own! She was unhappy with the brown that I had so she experimented until she found the colour she wanted. Once she started mixing, she decided to make every colour on her own.

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She did some amazing work today. She has worked really hard on balance and her Mona Lisa showed it. Impressive for grade four! Her Blue Period work was also completely independent. She just dove in a made it work. Her challenge was working in mostly monochromatic and still making her figure “pop.”

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She has no fear of colour. Her challenge was colour balance. Picasso really moved colours around and she decided to add the pink around the head at the last minute.

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This five year old completed the paint and portrait on his own and then he worked with a grade four friend to create the crazy creatures. They amused themselves for the whole hour and a half. The results are really funny and interesting.

There is no doubt that art lives inside human beings. The fun part is watching it come out.